Global Guerrillas on Raytheon: Resilience, Platforms and Collaboration

Stephen DeAngelis

April 24, 2006

The discussion about Development in a Box — and the larger Enterprise Resilience Management framework — continues to evolve.  One of the exciting moments in a new exploration is the moment when the conversation begins to take on a life of its own, and true collaboration begins.  The online environment makes that moment more evident, and enables more good thinkers to contribute.  All of that seems to be happening here.

The latest entrant in the discussion is John Robb, who posts at Global Guerrillas about the Raytheon DIB software platform, and notes:

…everything you’ve heard about Barnett’s sys-admin force or Enterra’s development in a box aren’t even conceivable without this software platform.

My colleague Tom Barnett comments:

Robb’s a good judge on these things, so worth checking. Sounds like foundation platform for the envisioned GIG (global info grid). If so, then John is right to say SysAdmin and Development-in-a-Box may well depend on it. To that end, my work with Steve DeAngelis and Enterra in bringing rule-set automation capacity to the GIG (dynamic governance) may also become dependent on the success of the software platform John raves about here. So you can bet Steve and I will be interacting with DoD on this emerging capability, as we aggressively seek to understand anything that significantly influences the GIG’s evolution.

As always, it’s all about connectivity, and as usual the military sets huge precedence.

This is why, despite our skyrocketing success in the private-sector, Steve is deeply committed to building a vibrant fed-sector presence for Enterra. Simply too much precedence at stake here for us not to play thought leader as much as possible.

Agreed, and this seems to be a promising intersection.  We would only add that the Enterprise Resilience Management framework — because it is standards-based — could conceivably take advantage of the Raytheon platform, or of others.  Time, specific organizational needs and real collaborative effort, will reveal what works best.  Collaboration is at the heart of resilience — not only in terms of discussion and conceptual evolution, but also in the operation of the framework itself.