Are People Truly Excited about the Smart Cities Movement?

Last year, a study published by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) found, “Only 18 per cent of the British public has heard of a ‘smart city’.”[1] I suspect the British public is not much different than citizens of other countries; yet, a recent Smart Cities Consumer Research Study, conducted in partnership with Silver …

Smart Cities: Science Fiction or Possibility?

“Every mayor wants their city to be ‘smart’,” writes Eleanor Cummins (@elliepses), “but harder is doing what it takes to increase the IQ of inanimate infrastructure, or finding the money or people to make it possible.”[1] We’ve all viewed futuristic science fiction films depicting flying cars, autonomous vehicles, smart advertising, and dozens of other futuristic …

Smart Cities and People

The smart cities movement is based on the premise that greater connectivity will make systems smarter allowing urban entities to use resources more wisely. Too often, however, discussions focus on technologies and physical systems rather than focusing on people and how technology can improve the quality of life for citizens. For cities to become truly …

Smart Cities put People First

Most discussions about smart cities focus on how technology can be leveraged to make urban systems more efficient. I believe no city deserves to be called “smart” unless it makes improving the quality of life for its residents the primary objective of its efforts. IBM believes “people” are one of the six core systems smart …